Heavy #1: Comic Book Review

Series: Heavy
Issue: 1

Words: Max Bremis
Art: Eryk Donovan
Colors: Cris Peter
Letters: Taylor Esposito

Publisher: Vault
Published: September 16, 2020
Publisher’s Summary: Bill may be dead, but he’s got a job to do. Welcome to the Big Wait, where folks who don’t quite make the cut go to work off their debt. Everyone in the Wait’s got a job. Bill is a Heavy, whose job is policing the multiverse, making sure bad eggs get what’s coming to them. He’s on track to earn his Climb and reunite with the woman he loves…until he meets his new partner: the worst dude of all time. Heavy is The Punisher for neurotics; Inception for the impatient; Preacher for…well, it’s a lot like Preacher. Max Bemis (Moon Knight, Centipede, X-Men: Worst X-Man Ever) and Eryk Donavan (Memetic, Ghost of Ohio) bring you a story about the existential purpose of dumb boys with big guns.


Review

Rather than float around aimlessly with unbaptized babies, the dead folk of Heavy who aren’t good enough to get into Heaven, or bad enough to get into Hell, are put to work in the Big Wait until they earn their spot in the afterlife. Bill, this story’s protagonist, is a Heavy: a big dude with a gun who travels through spacetime to kicking ass, righting wrongs, and maintaining balance. While counting down the days until he is free of his post-life task—which is terribly difficult because time doesn’t actually exist—Bill struggles with helplessness and anger, because when he was murdered, he, of course, was forced to leave behind the (still-living) love of his life, his wife Sharon.

Conceptually, Heavy successfully stitches together of slew of familiar tales and tropes into a fresh, albeit blood-stained, tapestry that’s as exciting to read as it is thought-provoking. Blending humor with hard-hitting action, writer Max Bemis immediately immerses readers in action and drama, providing them with a much needed distraction from the doldrums of daily life, while simultaneously giving them good reason to laugh and take life a little less seriously.

Eryk Donovan’s artwork is stunning and perfectly complements Bemis’ script; readers will practically smell the aroma of freshly plucked truffles, while reading, and will simultaneously love and hate the creative team for making that happen.

Come issue’s end, it quickly becomes clear that readers were given but a glimpse at what is still to come, giving them good reason to eagerly await the release of Heavy #2.

The Bottom Line

Fresh and intense, Heavy packs two-tons of hard-hitting humor and stands tall among its peers and predecessors, establishing itself as a must-read series. This debut is does everything it sets out to do, and more, giving readers good reason to come back, issue after issue.

Heavy #1: Comic Book Review
The Bottom Line
Fresh and intense, Heavy packs two-tons of hard-hitting humor and stands tall among its peers and predecessors, establishing itself as a must-read series. This debut is does everything it sets out to do, and more, giving readers good reason to come back, issue after issue.
9.5
Score

Charlie Chipman
Charlie Chipman
The kind of guy who almost always ends his e-mails with, "Cheers," Charlie serves as Editor-in-Chief here at The Brazen Bull where he often reviews comic books and television shows. His favorite punctuation mark is the interrobang‽

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