Invisible Kingdom #1 Review

Title: Invisible Kingdom
Publisher: Dark Horse
Words: G. Willow Wilson
Art: Christian Ward
Colors: Christian Ward
Published: March 20, 2019

Publisher’s Summary: Set in a far-flung star system, this new epic sci-fi monthly saga tells the tale of two women—a young religious acolyte and a hard-bitten freighter pilot—who separately uncover a vast conspiracy between the leader of the system’s dominant religion and the mega-corporation that controls society. On the run from reprisals on both sides, this unlikely pair of rebels risk plunging the world into anarchy if they reveal the truth. But when your beliefs betray you, what choice is there left? By Hugo Award-winning writer G. Willow Wilson (Wonder Woman, Ms. Marvel) and Eisner Award-winning artist Christian Ward (Black Bolt, ODY-C).


Review

In a far-off solar system, two women discover a deep conspiracy. One is the pilot of a freighter, delivering goods to various planets. The other is a seeker of religion. Both stumble upon the conspiracy by chance but are now faced with a decision: dig deeper and discover the truth or ignore the facts and maintain the status quo.

G. Willow Wilson crafts an epic science fiction narrative in Invisible Kingdom #1. This debut has all the elements of classic science fiction storytelling: a distant solar system, competing ideologies, and high-level corruption. The best way to describe this first issue is multilayered. The dynamic between religion and government is present from the start, but there’s also the connection between the two main characters. Wilson weaves a thought-provoking story in her two main characters as both face difficult choices ahead of them. Similarly, the world Wilson builds is foreign, but with parallels to our own, adding depth. Rarely do I read science fiction as good as Invisible Kingdom #1.

A mesmerizing visual experience! Christian Ward crafts a world both foreign and familiar in Invisible Kingdom #1. While Wilson’s script connects to familiar ideas, Ward’s art submerges readers in the unknown. There’s an abstract quality to the art, the setting is less defined and more felt as Ward favors color over shapes. In the colors, readers are not only connected to the characters, but to the tone of particular settings and actions. Take your time exploring the panels, the world of Invisible Kingdom opens up the more you look.

The Bottom Line

Invisible Kingdom #1 is like Ray Bradbury meets Ursula Le Guin, but with Wilson’s unique voice. Wilson crafts a complex and intriguing story that captures you in the first few panels all the while Christian Ward’s art creates a stunning and intense reading experience.

The Bottom Line
Invisible Kingdom #1 is like Ray Bradbury meets Ursula Le Guin, but with Wilson's unique voice. Wilson crafts a complex and intriguing story that captures you in the first few panels all the while Christian Ward’s art creates a stunning and intense reading experience.
Yes!
Invisible Kingdom is like Ray Bradbury meets Ursula Le Guin, but with Wilson's unique voice.
G. Willow Wilson pens an epic science fiction story in the making
Christian Ward's art creates an unparalleled visual experience.
No...
9.8
Score

Jaimee Nadzan
Jaimee Nadzanhttps://www.thebrazenbull.com
When she's not hanging with her gang at The Bronze, this young Sunnydale resident slays...wait, no, that's Buffy Summers. Jaimee serves as Editor here at The Brazen Bull.

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