Batwoman (2017-) #18 Review

Title: Batwoman (2017-) #18
Publisher: DC
Writer: Marguerite Bennett
Artist: Fernando Blanco
Colors: John Rauch
Cover: Dan Panosian
Publication Date: August 15, 2018

Publisher’s Summary:
“It’s the series finale, and there’s a lot of drama to resolve for Kate Kane, both in and out of costume. As Batwoman, she teams with Renee Montoya to thwart Clock King’s latest time-bending enterprise: selling a drug that allows criminals to know if their crime will be successful—before it’s committed. But Batwoman’s facing a quandary to boot: Take this drug off the street, or use it herself to stop crime? The only fight tougher is the personal one: Should Kate and Renee give their relationship another chance?”


Review:

Batwoman (2017-) #18 puts Batwoman head to head with Clock King, A.K.A. William Tockman. But Batwoman is fighting more than a misguided, middle-aged man with delusional ideals. There is a much more personal component to this issue, where Batwoman must come to grips with her own past, present, and potential future if she is truly going to defeat Clock King and save the day.

An exquisite exploration of the human psyche, Marguerite Bennett brings together some of the most troubling aspects of Batwoman’s storyline, particularly her regret over past events, then she sends Batwoman on pages of internal exploration. Clock King is really just the opening act for Batwoman who must really come to terms with her own life, and it’s meaning. Perhaps one of the most thought provoking issues, Batwoman (2017-) #18 calls into question the meaning of time, life, and hero. And Batwoman answers those questions all while taking down a huge criminal mastermind and spoiling his nefarious plot. Bennett flexes her gift for speech in this issue, reaching out to explore the hidden meaning in life for Batwoman. And the end result is simply stunning.

Fernando Blanco seamlessly fills in the places where the written word cannot go. Drawing stunning full page montages, of lives past and future for Batwoman. As Bennett unfolds the story through language, Blanco crafts a truly stunning visual narrative. Together Bennett and Blanco bring together Batwoman’s story, the perfect blending of language and art.

The Bottom Line:

You really should be reading Batwoman already, but if you’re not, go out and buy this issue. Marguerite Bennett’s style for narrative is a truly amazing gift, and the level of thoughtfulness she brings to the Batwoman character is unmatched.

The Bottom Line
You really should be reading Batwoman already, but if you’re not, go out and buy this issue. Marguerite Bennett’s style for narrative is a truly amazing gift, and the level of thoughtfulness she brings to the Batwoman character is unmatched.
Yes!
Unparalleled storytelling
No...
9.7
Score

Jaimee Nadzan
Jaimee Nadzanhttps://www.thebrazenbull.com
When she's not hanging with her gang at The Bronze, this young Sunnydale resident slays...wait, no, that's Buffy Summers. Jaimee serves as Editor here at The Brazen Bull.

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