Title: Proxima Centauri #2
Publisher: Image
Writer/Artist/Cover: Farel Dalrymple
Publication Date: July 18, 2018

Publisher’s Summary: “PROXIMA CENTAURI,” Part Two Critically injured, amulet and protective spells failing, no friends or help in sight, Sherwood Presley Breadcoat escapes his problems by delving into his memories of his first days on board the Scientist’s ship.”


Review:

Sherwood finds himself in a spot of trouble this issue. However, rather than work towards a potential solution, he opts to escape into his own mind. Inside his memories are clues to his relationships with the others on the ship, his own personality, and what is happening in the world of Proxima Centauri.

Proxima Centauri continues to be a psychologically complex story, an introspective journey through the mind of young Sherwood. In this issue, Dalrymple uses Sherwood’s memories as a way to create backstory for his characters and give context to Sherwood’s current predicament. What follows is a rabbit-hole of random, or maybe not-so-random, recollections from Sherwood’s past. The scenes inside Sherwood’s mind range in emotion, from first meetings to personal shortcomings. Though Sherwood is depicted as a teenager, or somewhere there about, his ability self-analyze and reflect gives him at least the appearance of maturity.

The images that Dalrymple creates in this issue are much richer, perhaps implying that Sherwood is more rooted in the past than he is in the present. Unlike Issue #1, which was very monotone, Proxima Centauri #2 presents a much more dramatic world inside Sherwood’s memories. It appears that the past is a place full of complexity. The beige present is much more empty, almost lifeless compared to Sherwood’s colorful, detailed past.

The Bottom Line:

Another solid issue; Dalrymple lets the images speak for themselves, giving just enough written word to create context, but not enough to overshadow the visual world. The pace of the story is steady, giving readers the just enough new information without rushing the issue. 

The Bottom Line
This is another solid issue. Dalrymple lets the images speak for themselves, giving just enough written word to create context, but not too much that would overshadow the visual world. The pace of the story is steady, giving readers the just enough new information without rushing the issue. 
Yes!
Well-paced
Interesting backstory
No...
8
Score