Comic Book Review: Imaginary Fiends (2017-) #2

TitleImaginary Fiends (2017-) #2
Publisher: DC / Vertigo
Arc: The Cat’s Paw
Part: 2
Words: Tim Seeley
Art: Stephen Molnar
Colors: Quinton Winter
Letters: Carlos M. Mangual
Publication Date: December 27, 2017     
Publisher’s Summary: “Melba is assigned to her first case, investigating a series of child disappearances in rural Georgia. As Melba and Agent Crockett uncover clues about the horror gripping the residents, Melba must resist both the temptation to escape into the real world after spending seven years locked up and the terrible appetite of the newly unleashed Polly Peachpit, Melba’s own personal psychic parasite—a massive spider-human only Melba can see, but is far from imaginary. ”
Review

After reading Issue#1, I was relatively sure that, once the typical first-issue-housekeeping that must be done was done, Imaginary Fiends would take off. In Issue #2, that’s exactly what happens, except rather than taking off, writer Tim Seeley pushes readers headfirst down a horrifying rabbit hole.  Imaginary Fiends is, and will continue to be, one hell of a trip.

While Imaginary Fiends (2017-) #2 isn’t off-the-wall scary, it’s creepy, and as far as I am concerned, creepy is worse than scary; creepy lingers in the back of one’s mind for some time while scary happens and then it’s over. There are scenes in Imaginary Fiends (2017-) #2 that are so odd – so creepy – that I can still see them, and the thought of these scenes taking place in real life sends a chill down my spine.

Thanks to its smooth narrative flow and emotion-filled artwork, reading Imaginary Fiends (2017-) #2 feels similar to watching a Horror film of sorts. As long as Seeley and Molnarcan keep this up, you can count on me to keep reading and recommending this book.

The Bottom Line: 

Just two issues in and this exciting new series has blossomed into an odd masterpiece; Imaginary Fiends (2017-) #2 is eerie and exciting and in Issue #2, now that the introductions have been made, Seeley raises the stakes and produces a must-read comic.